COVID-19 Safety Protocols Here

COVID-19 Safety Protocols Here

Puppy Raising 101

Puppy Raising 101

Congratulations on your new puppy!

What you need to know to keep him healthy and happy!

HEAL Veterinary Hospital is your partner in helping your puppy get started on the right paw! These early months of life are important in determining the health, behavior and well-being of the adult dog your puppy will become.

Pet Insurance

Now is the time to sign your dog up for pet health insurance! This coverage…

Now is the time to sign your dog up for pet health insurance! This coverage is significantly less expensive if you obtain it early in your puppy’s life and will help cover many major veterinary expenses that occur when he’s older.

Read More

Regular exams

Starting at 8 weeks of age, we’ll check for congenital issues, soundness of body and…

Starting at 8 weeks of age, we’ll check for congenital issues, soundness of body and signs of infectious issues. Please bring a fresh (within 24 hours) fecal sample in a labeled and sealed plastic bag. This is so we can screen for internal parasites. We’ll also discuss external parasites (fleas and ticks); never use parasite preventative not approved for puppies on your baby.

Read More

Vaccinating Your Puppy

Vaccinations with boosters are especially important for young puppies as they do not have full…

Vaccinations with boosters are especially important for young puppies as they do not have full immunity from many serious infectious diseases. Puppies are commonly given a series of combo vaccinations against distemper, adenovirus-2, parainfluenza and parvo virus (DHPP). When they are old enough, they’ll need rabies vaccinations, which are required by law. 

Other vaccinations, such as those for leptospirosis and kennel cough (bordetella), can be given as well, depending upon your dog’s lifestyle. We give vaccinations in a series, four weeks apart, so your baby will have maximum immunity for fighting infectious diseases. It’s critical to ensure your puppy has completed the entire series of combo vaccinations to keep him or her protected. Puppies aren’t fully vaccinated until the last DAPP at around 14-16 weeks, so minimize socialization with other dogs of unknown vaccine history.

Core vaccines
3 rounds of DAPP, last round closer to 14-16 weeks. Should start when they are 8 weeks old
Lepto/dapp combination 10-11 weeks
Rabies at 12 weeks
Bordetella, bolstered at 6 months

Non-core vaccines based on lifestyle
Lyme (2 rounds) if going to tick-endemic places, hiking, New Jersey, Connecticut, the Hamptons
Flu (2 rounds) if planning on boarding, doggy daycare, show dog

Read More

What to Feed Your Puppy

Your baby needs lots of calories to grow strong, so offer good quality food formulated…

Your baby needs lots of calories to grow strong, so offer good quality food formulated specifically for puppies. Follow the package directions for weight or age and offer food three times a day. If you are unable to offer a separate mid-day feeding, then split the additional amount and add it to the morning and evening feeding. Give him a chance to go potty after eating, and always provide plenty of fresh water. 

Use premium canned food to fill Kong-like toys. Freeze it and you’ll have a great treat that will keep him happily occupied, especially when you are working on leaving him alone or crate training.

The diet you select for your puppy should help him grow healthy and strong—another reason for regular health exams that include weight measurement. We’d be happy to help you select the most appropriate diet for your growing pup.

Read More

Spay/neuter

Spaying or neutering your dog has health benefits, in addition to helping with pet overpopulation.…

Spaying or neutering your dog has health benefits, in addition to helping with pet overpopulation. Spay or neuter your puppy at 6 months of age if under 50 lbs., and at one year if over 50 lbs. because there is a correlation between orthopedic neoplasia and early spaying/neutering in large breed dogs.

Read More

Baths and Tooth Brushing 

You can bathe a puppy that is at least 8 weeks of age, once or…

You can bathe a puppy that is at least 8 weeks of age, once or twice a month. Feel free to spot clean or use hypoallergenic wipes if needed. Use only puppy shampoo—oatmeal-based shampoos are the most moisturizing—and never allow any water or shampoo to get inside your little one’s mouth, ears or eyes. Dry him with a soft fluffy towel and stay with him in a nice warm room until he is totally dry.

Puppies have a full set of adult teeth at 6 months and brushing them helps to keep them healthy and plaque free. Providing home dental care early can protect your puppy’s teeth while getting him used to having his mouth handled. Get your pup accustomed to your fingers and toothbrush by waiting until he is calm, then sliding your finger or toothbrush on gum line. Visit Vhoc.com, a veterinary dental website, for more information.

Read More

Socialization

Puppies need socialization, or exposure to new things, in the first four months of their…

Puppies need socialization, or exposure to new things, in the first four months of their lives to help them grow into happy, confident adult dogs. At this stage, their curiosity about new things outweighs their fear of the unknown. After four months of age, the window of opportunity starts to close, and new things may cause stress instead. Puppies could develop behavioral issues like fear aggression, separation anxiety or dog-to-dog reactivity if they aren’t properly socialized as puppies. 

Start by slowly introducing your puppy to your family and friends; no big parties that may overwhelm him! He can meet respectful dogs one by one, but stay away from dog parks because there may be unvaccinated dogs playing there.

Practice handling for future visits to the vet or groomer by slowly massaging all parts of the body, including paws so nail trimming won’t be scary. Expose your puppy to new sounds like the vacuum cleaner or the doorbell. Sing, read or simply talk to your baby, and reward generously if he responds to his name. Never yell at your puppy, no matter how frustrated you may be. He’ll learn to fear you and you won’t develop the bond that you both want and need.

Just like people, each dog is an individual. Any dog is capable of being friendly, social, fearful or aggressive. Get to know your puppy’s specific personality and traits. Respect him for who he is and he’ll be your best friend for life!

Read More

Microchipping 

This small transmitter is your pet’s ticket home if he becomes lost. Insertion usually causes…

This small transmitter is your pet’s ticket home if he becomes lost. Insertion usually causes very little pain; however, many pet parents opt to have this done while their pet is anesthetized for spay/neuter surgery. 

The microchip is contained in a capsule smaller than a grain of rice and is non-toxic, hypoallergenic and completely safe. A simple procedure places the chip just under the skin. These microchips never need to be removed or recharged during your pet’s lifetime.

Read More

Exercise

Dogs need adequate exercise because regular workouts support skeletomuscular and cardiovascular health. After he has…

Dogs need adequate exercise because regular workouts support skeletomuscular and cardiovascular health. After he has completed his vaccinations, you can take your puppy on short walks.  

Let him get to know his new neighborhood by walking around the block and then slow increasing distance in concentric circles as he becomes more confident.

Follow your pup’s lead; don’t go too far too fast and be sure to let him stop and sniff. Teach him to walk nicely on a loose leash and always take plenty of treats with you on walks to reward good behavior. You can exercise at home too, by playing ball and teaching him to fetch. Get him used to stairs, and they can become part of his workout, too, especially on rainy days.

Read More

Children and Your New Puppy

Remember, safety first. Any dog or cat will bite if provoked. Children are fast-moving, loud…

Remember, safety first. Any dog or cat will bite if provoked. Children are fast-moving, loud and unaware of an animal’s body language. They are tempted to hug and kiss dogs or disturb a sleeping animal, which can lead to bites and scratches. Never allow your child to climb on a dog, pull his ears or tease him. Unfortunately, social media is full of photos and videos depicting children in unsafe situations with pets because parents unknowingly think it looks “cute.” 

Learn and teach children about animal body language. Make sure your puppy has some quiet time when he can decompress if you have a rowdy, active family. And never leave young children unsupervised with any pet no matter how well you think you know the animal.

Read More

A Healthy, Happy Dog!

We look forward to getting to know your new puppy and watching him grow into a mature, confident dog. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please call us at (929) 359-9297.

Leave a Comment